Overturn Image License (John 2:13-22)

Overturn Image License (John 2:13-22)

15.00

DIGITAL DOWNLOAD FOR ONE-TIME LICENSE

Interested in licensing a single image for worship or ministry use? This one-time license grants you permission to use this image for ministry purposes. Print the image as bulletin cover art or project the art and engage with it during worship, Sunday School, or Youth Group. We hope you might use our images as tools for spiritual formation.

If you are interested in an art print of this piece, please visit our print shop.

Overturn
by Rev. Lisle Gwynn Garrity
Inspired by John 2:13-22
Digital Painting with collage

From our “Again & Again” Lent & Easter 2021 collection.

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Order includes:

  • high-res image file formatted for print

  • high-res image file formatted for web/projection

  • A PDF of the Artist's statements & scripture reference for the visual

  • A visio divina Bible Study Guide for you to use this image in a group study session that incorporates the ancient Benedictine spiritual practice of "divine seeing."

Credit info:

When printing and sharing online, please always include the following credits:
Artist's name | A Sanctified Art LLC | sanctifiedart.org

From the artist:

In 1965, my grandfather moved his family of six to Birmingham, AL, to become the new senior pastor of First Presbyterian Church. Situated downtown, First Pres sits only a few blocks away from 16th Street Baptist Church, the site of the 1963 bombing attack by white supremacists who killed four young girls. Earlier that same year, Dr. King addressed eight prominent white clergy in his now famous “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” My grandfather’s predecessor was one of those clergy. They prompted King’s famous letter by requesting he appeal to law and order. In essence they said to him: “We agree with your movement, but your methods are too harsh. The demonstrations are destructive and causing too much backlash. You’re bringing agitators into our city. Wait for a better time and negotiate gently.”

This is the context in which my grandfather began his ministry with First Pres. While he helped the church change their policy to become open to worshipers of all races (a process that undoubtedly required much moral fortitude), I wonder how often he, too, felt the urge of his predecessor and the other white clergy who had written to Dr. King. I wonder how often he preferred for justice to happen slowly, gently, and in an orderly manner. I think often about how that urge lives in me too.

In this image, I wanted to freeze-frame the destruction Jesus ignites, forcing us as viewers to focus on the process of dismantling and destroying an oppressive system. For those who willingly or unwillingly benefit from systems of oppression, it may feel threatening and terrifying to see them all come tumbling down. But for those held within the unrelenting grip of injustice, it must be completely and utterly liberating.

Again and again, Jesus shows us that his movement is about overturning systems of oppression to bring forth God’s beloved community on earth. Again and again, liberation movements throughout history pursue this same goal. Will we join Jesus in the overturning, or like the disciples, question his methods?

—Rev. Lisle Gwynn Garrity

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